How to make Biryani|Types of Biryani

Biryani

      Biryani (/bɜːrˈjɑːni/) is a mixed rice dish with its origins among the Muslims of the Indian subcontinent.It is made with Indian spices, rice, and meat (chicken, beef, goat, lamb, prawn, or fish), or vegetables and sometimes, in addition, eggs and/or potatoes in certain regional varieties. It is popular throughout the Indian subcontinent, as well as among its Diaspora. It is also prepared in other regions such as parts of Afghanistan, Iran and Iraq. It is a dish that has acquired a niche for itself in South Asian cuisine.

The top 10 biryani delicacy according to Wikipedia

Kacchi biryani

      For kacchi biryani, raw marinated meat is layered with raw rice before being cooked together. It is also known as kacchi yeqni. It is typically cooked with goat meat. The dish is cooked layered with the meat and a dahi-based marinade at the bottom of the cooking pot. A layer of rice (usually basmati rice or chinigura rice) is placed over it. Potatoes are often added before adding the rice layer. The pot is usually sealed (typically with wheat dough) to allow it to cook in its own steam and it is not opened until it is ready to serve.

Tehari

Tehari, tehri or tehari are various names for the vegetarian version of biryani. It was developed for the Hindu bookkeepers of the Muslim Nawabs. It is prepared by adding the potatoes to the rice, as opposed to the case of traditional biryani, where the rice is added to the meat. In Kashmir, tehari is sold as street food. Tehari became more popular during World War II, when meat prices increased substantially and potatoes became the popular substitute for rice.

Beef biryani

      Beef biryani, as the name implies, uses beef as the meat. In Hyderabad, it is famous as Kalyani biryani, in which buffalo or cow meat is used. This meal was started after the Kalyani Nawabs of Bidar came to Hyderabad sometime in the 18th century. The Kalyani biryani is made with small cubes of beef, regular spices, onions and many tomatoes. It has a distinct tomato, jeera and dhania flavor.[30] In Kerala, beef biryani is well known.[31] The Bhatkali biryani is a special biryani where the main ingredient is onion. Its variations include beef, goat, chicken, titar, egg, fish, crab, prawn and vegetable biryani.

Ambur/Vaniyambadi biryani

      Ambur/Vaniyambadi biryani is a type of biryani cooked in the neighboring towns of Ambur and Vaniyambadi in the Tirupattur district of the northeastern part of Tamil Nadu, which has a high Muslim population. It was introduced by the Nawabs of Arcot who once ruled the area. It is typically made with Basmati or Jeera Samba rice.

      The Ambur/Vaniyambadi biryani is accompanied with ‘dhalcha,’ a sour brinjal curry and ‘pachadi’ or raitha(sliced onions mixed with plain curd, tomato, chilies and salt). It has a distinctive aroma and is considered light on the stomach. The usage of spice is moderate and curd is used as a gravy base. It also has a higher ratio of meat to rice. Ambur-style biriyani is popular as street food all across South India.

Bhatkali/Navayathi biryani

      This is an integral part of the Navayath cuisine and a specialty of Bhatkal, a coastal town in Karnataka. Its origins are traced to the Persian traders who left behind not only biryani but a variation of kababs and Indian breads. In Bhatkali biryani the meat is cooked in an onion and green chili based masala and layered with fragrant rice. It has a unique spicy and heady flavour, and the rice is overwhelmingly white with mild streaks of orange. Though similar to those in Thalassery, this biryani differs with lingering after-notes of mashed onions laced with garlic. A few chilies and spices littered with curry leaves lends a unique flavour to Bhatkal biryani. No oil is used

Bohri biryani

      The Bohri biryani, prepared by the Bohris is flavoured with many tomatoes.[19] It is popular in Karachi.

Chettinad biryani

      Chettinad biryani is famous in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. It is made of jeeraka samba rice, and smells of spices and ghee. It is best taken with nenju elumbu kuzhambu, a spicy and tangy goat meat gravy. The podi kozhi is usually topped with fried onions and curry leaves.

Degh Ki biryani

      Degh ki biryani is a typical biryani made from small cubes of beef or mutton. This biryani is famous in Parbhani and generally serves in marriages.The meat is flavoured with ginger, garlic, red chili, cumin, garam masala, fried onion and Curd. This is also known as kachay gosht or the dum biryani, where the meat is marinated and cooked along with the rice. It is left on a slow fire or dum for a fragrant and aromatic flavor.

Delhi biryani

      The Delhi version of the biryani developed a unique local flavor as the Mughal kings shifted their political capital to the North Indian city of Delhi. Until the 1950s, most people cooked biryani in their home and rarely ate at eateries outside of their homes. Hence, restaurants primarily catered to travelers and merchants. Any region that saw more of these two classes of people nurtured more restaurants, and thus their own versions of biryani. This is the reason why most shops that sold biryani in Delhi, tended to be near mosques such as Jama Masjid (for travellers) or traditional shopping districts (such as Chandni Chowk). Each part of Delhi has its own style of biryani, often based on its original purpose, thus giving rise to Nizamuddin, Shahjahanabad biryani, etc. Nizamuddin biryani usually had little expensive meat and spices as it was primarily meant to be made in bulk for offering at the Nizamuddin Dargah shrine and thereafter to be distributed to devotees.[21] A non-dum biryani, using many green chillies, popularized by the Babu Shahi Bawarchi shops located outside the National Sports Club in Delhi is informally called Babu Shahi biryani. Another version of Delhi biryani uses achaar (pickles) and is called achaari biryani

Hyderabadi biryani

      Hyderabadi biryani is one of India’s most famous biryanis; some say biryani is synonymous with Hyderabad. The crown dish of the Hyderabadi Muslims, Hyderabadi biryani developed under the rule of Asaf Jah I, who was first appointed as the governor of Deccan by the Mughal Emperor Aurangzeb. It is made with basmati rice, spices and goat meat. Popular variations use chicken instead of goat meat. There are various forms of Hyderabadi biryani. One such biryani is the kachay gosht ki biryani or the dum biryani, where the goat meat is marinated and cooked along with the rice. It is left on a slow fire or dum for a fragrant and aromatic flavor

(Source:- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Biryani)

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